Saturday, September 21, 2019

Yes it's a wig. We can help.
Check us out on Google "Susan's @ Antonino Salon". Alopecia. Chemotherapy. Hairloss.  Call us at 248-544-4287.

Tuesday, September 3, 2019


How current hormone treatments can send breast cancer cells into a dormant “sleeper mode”

The study offers new insights into what triggers certain breast cancer cells to become dormant 'sleeper' cells (red) or remain active cancer cells (green).
The study offers new insights into what triggers certain breast cancer cells to become dormant 'sleeper' cells (red) or remain active cancer cells (green).
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The looming threat of a relapse is something that hovers over many cancer survivors. Breast cancer in particular is known to enter extremely long dormant periods, and a new study led by researchers from Imperial College London is suggesting the drugs used to initially treat the cancer may be responsible, triggering some cancer cells to enter a sleeper state.
Around 70 percent of breast cancers are classified as oestrogen-receptor positive. This means the cancer utilizes oestrogen to grow, and following an initial surgery hormone drug therapy is usually administered. However, the relapse rate for patients undergoing this kind of hormone therapy is about 30 percent, and the cancer can unexpectedly recur as late as 20 years after initial treatment.
“For a long time scientists have debated whether hormone therapies – which are a very effective treatment and save millions of lives – work by killing breast cancer cells or whether the drugs flip them into a dormant ‘sleeper’ state,” says Luca Mangani, lead author on the new study.
Investigating thousands of breast cancer cells in the lab, the new study discovered current hormone treatments can in fact trigger some cancer cells to enter a dormant phase. Not only that, but the researchers also suspect this dormant phase to be part of the process the cancer cells move through before ultimately becoming resistant to the hormone therapy.
“These sleeper cells seem to be an intermediate stage to the cells becoming resistant to the cancer drugs,” explains Iros Barozzi, co-author on the new study. “The findings also suggest the drugs actually trigger the cancer cells to enter this sleeper state.”
This new study in no way suggests women be hesitant in undergoing hormone therapy to treat breast cancer but instead it directs researchers to new understandings into how cancer cells enter dormant phases and why they reawaken years later. Answering these questions could help prevent long-term breast cancer relapses.
“If we can unlock the secrets of these dormant cells, we may be able to find a way of preventing cancer coming back, either by holding the cells in permanent sleep mode, or be waking them up and killing them,” says Mangani.
The new study was published in the journal Nature Communications.

Can low gravity kill cancer? Scientists prepare to study cells in space

Next year, scientists will send cancer cells for study aboard the International Space Station
Next year, scientists will send cancer cells for study aboard the International Space Station
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We’ve been sending humans to space for more than half a century now, but there is still so much to learn about how a low-gravity environment impacts our physiology. An Australian scientist has been looking into such matters through simulation studies here on Earth, and with early indications that space can kill off the majority of cancer cells without the need for drugs, is now preparing to launch his experiments toward the International Space Station for further investigation.
There are quite a few studies that have been completed or are ongoing at the International Space Station that explore the effects of low-gravity on living organisms and human physiology.
NASA has previously studied cellular changes of mice and mussels on the ISS to gain new insights into the human immune system and looked into how the microgravity environment can lead to vision impairment. The agency’s twin study, meanwhile, comparing the biology of an identical twin who spent almost a year at the ISS with the other who did not, continues to be one of the more intriguing examples.
But the intricacies of how cancer cells behave in the microgravity environment remains largely unexplored. Biomedical engineer Joshua Chou has been conducting experiments in his laboratory at the University of Technology Sydney to advance our understanding of this, using a micro-gravity simulator to observe how cancer cells respond and the potential reasons why.
“Prior to this research, most focus has been on the genetic expression of cancer under microgravity,” Chou explains to New Atlas. “But no one has looked at the mechanisms, and the strategy of how we are approaching this is to identify the sensing receptors in the cancer, in hope of tricking them.”
Scientists hope to learn more about the behavior of cancer cells by launching them into space
Scientists hope to learn more about the behavior of cancer cells by launching them into space
Chou and his student Anthony Kirollos exposed ovarian, breast, nose and lung cancer cells to the micro-gravity simulator for a 24-hour period, and found that it caused 80 to 90 percent of them to die, as first reported by the ABC. The scientists believe this is because the lack of gravitational force on the cells influences how they communicate with one another and makes them unable to sense their surroundings, something they call mechanical unloading.
“I have to clarify that microgravity does affect other cells, like bone cells, that is why astronauts lose bone,” Chou tells us. “But having said that, the different tissues and organs in the body respond differently, and it’s just that we found bone and cancers are super sensitive to the effects of microgravity.”
Why this mechanical unloading effect hits cancer cells harder than most is one of the questions Chou hopes to shed some light on when he launches his experiment for the ISS next year. In the first Australian research mission to the ISS, the cells will be packed into a device smaller than a tissue box and studied within the micro-gravity environment for a period of one week.
“Twenty-four hours before launch, we will introduce the cells into microfluidic devices, they will go up to the ISS and the experiment will be carried out for seven days, but won’t return until after 28 days at the ISS,” Chou says. “Then of course we will do analysis upon its return. But we also designed technologies to study them while they are alive on the ISS.”
Sending cancer patients to space for treatment certainly seems a fanciful idea, and Chou isn’t looking to change that through his inventive line of investigation. The hope is that the experiments can shed light on the specific receptors and sensors behind the mechanical unloading effect on cancer cells, so scientists can design drugs that mimic the same effects here on Earth.
"I see what we are developing on working in conjunction with existing therapies and not replacing anything,“ Chou says. “What we hope is that it will increase efficiency of current drugs to give the patient an added advantage by disrupting the normal function of the cancer. Because if the cells can't 'function as a team' then it becomes easier to kill them.”
Source: ABC


FOR “THOSE” TIMES IN OUR LIVES

ALOPECIA. CHEMOTHERAPY. HAIR LOSS.

Now the expertise of two - Susan’s @ Antonino and Antonino Salon & Spa. We are so excited to take our wig services to a new level. You can explore new dimensions in fashion, color and style for your human hair wig. Whether you are going to that special evening event or just out for lunch around town your wig can be an extension of your inner self. We can create the look you have only dreamed about – from casual to formal. Once you have determined the look and feel we will custom tailor your wig so not only will you look great - you will be comfortable and secure.

You will first meet with Susan, Oncology Nurse and Breast Cancer Survivor, who will gently discuss your specific needs including price range style of wig, timing, wig care instructions including tips on how to keep your wig healthy. Then you will consult with our wonderful cosmetologist to find your perfect wig. We are here to help you during the loss of your hair whether from chemotherapy, alopecia or other. Depending upon your chemotherapy drug and cycle will determine how long you will be experiencing hair loss. That will help you decide what is right for you - Synthetic, Human Hair/Synthetic Blend, Human Hair.

Please call 248-544-4287 for your FREE consultation to explore solutions that are right for you. Susan's @ Antonino is by appointment only on Monday and Tuesday from 10:00 - 4:00. Wigs. Hairpieces. With Antonino Salon for Haircut. Style. Facial, Makeup. Nails. Massage.

Sunday, August 18, 2019

8 Simple Tips for Regrowing Healthy, Beautiful Hair After Chemo

Regrowing your beautiful hair after chemo can be an exercise in frustration because it seems to take forever. While hair can only grow so fast, there are ways to encourage longer, healthier locks.

DON’T OVER-WASH IT

Daily washing can strip hair of natural oils, which makes it more prone to breakage. Skip to every other day, or consider washing even less frequently if your hair type can tolerate it.
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STAY AWAY FROM HEAT

Blow driers, curling irons and similar heat-based tools can make your hair dry and brittle. Change up your daily routine to minimize the amount you use them.
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DON’T STRESS ABOUT IT

Your emotional state can actually affect your hair quality. Try to minimize the stress in your life by spending at least a few minutes a day meditating or doing other self-care.
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RE-THINK YOUR PRODUCTS

In addition to shampooing less often, consider switching products. Shampoos that contain silicones often leave residue, and those with sulfates may be too harsh and damaging.
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SKIP THE AFTER-SHOWER BRUSHING

Wet hair is more prone to breakage, so wait to brush it until your hair dries out. If you need to do some detangling while it is still wet, try using your fingers to gently break up knots.
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DEEP CONDITION WITH COCONUT OIL

Apply coconut oil to the ends of dry hair for a deep, all-natural conditioning treatment. Don’t overdo it, though, as too much can make your hair greasy. Even if your hair isn’t super dry, consider a weekly deep conditioning treatment.
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TAKE A COLD SHOWER

Okay, the whole shower doesn’t have to be cold, but rinse your hair out in cold water at the end of it. This smooths and seals the outer layer of hair, which helps lock in moisture and protect against damage.
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BREAK OUT THE SCISSORS

This one may seem counter-intuitive, but regular trims really do help your hair grow faster. A hair with a split end stops growing, so frequent small trims prevent disruptions.
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Now, discover even more ways to keep your hair healthy and beautiful from the inside out by clicking here!

https://blog.thebreastcancersite.greatergood.com/cs-tips-regrowing-hair/

Wednesday, August 7, 2019


LIGHTWEIGHT AND NATURAL - CUSTOM TAILORED WIGS




My new clients ask ... Are Wigs Hot?

The answer is No – Not all wigs are made the same. Lightweight wigs provide less density, less weight and are breathable. That means that once your wig is custom tailored to your head it will feel comfortable, not itchy, be cool and look natural. Lightweight options are available in human hair, human hair synthetic blends and synthetic. So whether you are experiencing hair loss due to Chemotherapy, Alopecia or other we can offer the best choice for you.

You will first meet with Susan, Oncology Nurse and Breast Cancer Survivor, who will discuss your needs including price range style, timing, wig care instructions including tips on how to keep your wig healthy and long lasting. Then you will consult with our cosmetologist to find that perfect wig. We are here to help you during the loss of your hair. Depending upon your chemotherapy drug and cycle will determine how long you will be experiencing hair loss. That will help you decide what is right for you - Synthetic, Human Hair/Synthetic Blend, Human Hair.

Our passion is all about personal service including Custom Tailoring your wig to fit your head for your comfort and security. We also offer Custom Color for Human Hair clients.

CALL 248-544-4287 FREE consultation to explore wig solutions right for you. We look forward to your visit. Susan's @ Antonino Salon, Birmingham, MI is by appointment only on Monday and Tuesday from 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM.

Monday, July 29, 2019



Blowing bubbles in the blood could kill cancer with both barrels

MEDICAL
Researchers have found that gas embolotherapy (blowing bubbles in the blood) could fight cancer in two...
Researchers have found that gas embolotherapy (blowing bubbles in the blood) could fight cancer in two ways(Credit: delfoto/Depositphotos)
VIEW GALLERY - 2 IMAGES

Cancer can be a tricky foe, so the best way to fight it might not be with a direct attack, but to cut off its supply lines. One such method, known as gas embolotherapy, involves creating tiny bubbles in the tumor blood vessels, which block the blood supply and starve the cancer out. Now, researchers from China and France have found that the technique could also deal a second blow as a drug delivery system.
The first step of gas embolotherapy involves researchers injecting droplets of a liquid into the blood vessels that feed a tumor. When an ultrasonic pulse is applied to the area, those droplets form tiny gas bubbles that clog up the vessels, blocking blood flow and suffocating the tumor. This part of the process is called acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV).
In past research, this process turned out to be more effective than was expected. Not only did the bubbles successfully cut off the blood supply, but other bubbles made their way into smaller vessels like capillaries, causing them to burst and leak, which dealt even more damage to the tumor.

A diagram showing how gas embolotherapy works to kill tumors

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In the new study, the team wanted to look closer at what was happening in the capillaries. For their tests, the researchers used samples of rat tissue in the lab, and injected droplets of dodecafluoropentane mixed with a bovine serum. Bubbles were then formed using ADV.
The team observed the bubbles lodging in the capillaries, where they built up and in some cases merged. A localized cavity was also spotted in the vessel wall, which the team says was likely caused by the bubbles rupturing the capillary.
The researchers say that this could open up a second avenue of attack against cancer. Gas embolotherapy could kill tumors by not only blocking their blood supply, but delivering drugs through the capillaries. That means the drugs could be administered directly to the tumor site, and since blood isn't circulating back out, it keeps them localized, preventing the drug from circulating through the body and harming healthy cells.
"In cancer therapy research, scientists are always interested in answering two questions: how to kill the cancer effectively and how to reduce the side effects of chemotherapeutic drugs," says Mingxi Wan, corresponding author of the paper. "We have found that gas embolotherapy has the potential to successfully address both of these areas."
The next steps for the researchers is to test the method in live rats.
The research was published in the journal Applied Physics Letters.





DREAM IT – WE CAN  CUSTOM  COLOR & TAILOR YOUR WIG

We can take you to a new and exciting world of color and magic -- Now the power of two - Susan’s @ Antonino and Antonino Salon & Spa. Explore new dimensions in fashion color and style for your human hair wig. Whether you are going to that special evening event or just out around town your wig can be an extension of your inner self. We can create the look you have only dreamed about – from casual to formal. Your consultation is free so we can explore the look you desire so not only will you look great but you will be comfortable and secure.

You will first meet with Susan, Oncology Nurse and Breast Cancer Survivor, who will gently discuss your specific needs including price range style of wig, timing, wig care instructions including tips on how to keep your wig healthy. Then you will consult with our wonderful cosmetologist to find your perfect wig. We are here to help you during the loss of your hair whether from chemotherapy, alopecia or other. Depending upon your chemotherapy drug and cycle will determine how long you will be experiencing hair loss. That will help you decide what is right for you - Synthetic, Human Hair/Synthetic Blend, Human Hair.

Our passion is all about personal service including Custom Color and Custom Tailoring for the perfect fit.

Please call 248-544-4287 for your FREE consultation to explore solutions right for you. We are by appointment only on Monday and Tuesday from 10 to 4. www.SusansSpecialNeeds.com

Monday, July 8, 2019


Common cold virus targets, and kills, bladder cancer in exciting early human trial

MEDICAL
A particular strain of the common cold, when delivered into the bladder by a catheter, was...
A particular strain of the common cold, when delivered into the bladder by a catheter, was seen to selectively attack and kill bladder cancer cells(Credit: katerynakon/Depositphotos)
An early-stage study has found a strain of the common cold virus can effectively target and destroy bladder cancer cells. This phase 1 human trial suggests the virus directly induces tumor cell death, and if verified by larger trials could be used in conjunction with other novel immunotherapy treatments.
An oncolytic virus is a class of virus known to target and kill cancer cells in one of two ways, either by directly hunting and eliminating tumor cells, or by helping the immune system better home in on a cancer by lighting up a cancer cell. Ongoing oncolytic research has revealed the zika virus attacking brain cancers, and the herpes virus attacking skin cancers.
Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is the most common type of bladder cancer and it is challenging to treat. Current treatments can involve a variety of either surgery, chemotherapy or immunotherapy, and still result in high rates of recurrence.
"Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is a highly prevalent illness that requires an intrusive and often lengthy treatment plan," explains Hardev Pandha, principle investigator on the new study. "Current treatment is ineffective and toxic in a proportion of patients and there is an urgent need for new therapies."
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This new research describes the results of a phase 1 trial using a strain of the common cold virus called coxsackievirus (CVA21), as an oncolytic agent targeting bladder cancer. The trial recruited 15 patients with NMIBC and administered CVA21 directly into the bladder via a catheter. One week after the treatment the patients underwent surgery to remove their bladder tumors, allowing the researchers to evaluate how well the virus had infiltrated the cancer cells.
The results were promising, with all patients displaying evidence the virus has effectively infiltrated the bladder cancer cells. Tumor cell death was seen to be triggered by the virus, and increases in inflammatory cytokines were noted, suggesting the virus also seemed to stimulate the body's immune system to better target and attack the cancer cells.
"Reduction of tumor burden and increased cancer cell death was observed in all patients and removed all trace of the disease in one patient following just one week of treatment, showing its potential effectiveness," says Pandha. "Notably, no significant side effects were observed in any patient."
Being a phase 1 human trial the primary goal was to evaluate safety and dosage, and the results were positive on this front, with no toxicities or adverse effects reported. The next step will be to expand these trials and explore whether this new treatment can be used in combination with new immunotherapy treatments.
This isn't the first research into using the common cold virus as an oncolytic agent. CVA21 in particular is looking promising as a treatment for melanoma and prostrate cancer, with several human trials currently underway evaluating its efficacy when used in conjunction with other immunotherapy treatments.
The new research was published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research.